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A radical off grid small farm

Fivepenny Farm

29 Oct – 2 Nov

We are a small mixed farm near the sea and very proud of being 100% off grid, producing our own electricity from wind turbines. We produce delicious ecological veggies, meat, preserves, herbal products and cheese.

Come to learn how we do it and to be a huge help to us volunteering, creating winter polytunnel beds,  a new goat house from cob, making cheese and apple pressing.
We have loads of kids and animals and cider and fun

No need for a tent – accommodation will be in our timber frame barn upstairs (as a group) or a caravan with a wood stove.


Tuck into meals made from our own or local produce – we are an animal based farm with our own meat, milk and cheese, but can cater for vegans and other special diets.

If you’re interested in low-impact developments (like straw bale homes on eco-smallholdings) and how the planning system in England tends to work against them, we’ve got lots of experience of the joyous planning system. We have links with Chapter 7, which gives advice on setting up low-impact developments and how to navigate the planning system.

We are also very active in UK food sovereignty activism, the Land is Ours and Via Campesina. If you’d like to find out about food sovereignty activism, here is a perfect place. Food sovereignty includes:

  • organic, low-input and agroecological farming
  • anti-GM
  • land rights, land access and protection against land grabs
  • seed saving, seed diversity and heritage varieties
  • farming that is knowledge intensive and labour intensive, rather than chemical intensive
  • local control of the food system, selling directly to the consumer
  • solidarity with global peasants’ movements such as Via Campesina

Book now! Booking deadline: 20 Oct
Get in touch with Jyoti Fernandes
Email jyoti@tlio.org.uk or call 01297 560 755
the closest train station is  Axminster, call me to collect you: 07875849754

Jyoti Fernandes: “The problem with international development, in the way it was taught, was that it seemed to be always about applying the “American path” to developing countries, which I thought was inappropriate. So, I dropped out of college, and began to talk to my father a lot about India: about the village where his family had come from and what their lives were like, and I realized how much he struggled with the consumerism of American culture and missed village life. I felt I needed to find out about Indian life, my father’s background: I didn’t even speak any of their language.

I travelled in India for about a year. The thing that really changed my life was visiting the Narmada Valley, in Gujarat, where there was a hydro-electric dam being built. There was a movement against the project and the environmental destruction it would create, led by activists who were followers of Gandhi’s philosophy. Involved in that movement I felt more passionate, more at home than ever before: I was 20 years old, I was working with people involved in non-violent direct action, who had their own ideas about development, which meant supporting local farmers and communities.”

Read Jyoti’s story in full

Fivepenny Farm is a 43 acre low-impact, sustainable smallholding where Jyoti Fernandez and her husband Dai Saltmarsh, with friends Oliver and Kerry Goolden, grow organic fruit and vegetables, and keep a small number of cattle, chickens and pigs. They specialise in growing traditional and heritage varieties of vegetables including many different tomatoes, selling their seasonal produce in Bridport market.

There is also timber-framed, thatched barn with solar and wind power, which provides a local food processing facility for a co-operative of mainly organic farmers and producers. They have an orchard, planted 5 years ago when they bought the land, two small areas of woodland and are restoring wildflower meadows.

One response to “A radical off grid small farm

  1. Ash ⋅

    Hi . I write from Australia where I live in a off grid home in the bush outside of Canberra with my partner &7 year old son?
    We are looking for a woofing opportunity next July.
    My partner is a trained horticulturalist and I also have experience in this area.
    Will you be looking for woofers at this point in time in the future?
    Cheers
    Ash

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